Rephotography

Rephotography is the act of repeat photography of the same site, with a time lag between the two images; a “then and now” view of a particular area. Some are casual, usually taken from the same view point but without regard to season, lens coverage or framing. Some are very precise and involve a careful study of the original image. Long a technique for scientific study, especially of changing ecological systems, it became formalized as a form of photographic documentary in the middle 1970s.

via Rephotography – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Could you find an old postcard or other photograph of your town, street or some area and create a ‘then and now’ rephotograph? I think getting the position just right would be tricky and take some real patience, likely several practice shots before you could hit it just right.

Other places to find rephotography:

Flickr: Rephotography
Flickr: Now and Then
Flickr: BBC Turn Back Time
Flickr: Paris Then and Now
Flickr: Vancouver “Then and Now”
Design Observer: Views Across Time
Thomas May Photography: Then and Now
Retronaut: Rephotographing St. Petersburg
Wired: Gadget Lab: Camera Software Lets You See into the Past
Web Designer Depot: Then and Now Portrait Photography by Irina Werning
Fourmilab: The Craft of “Then and Now” Photography

You Don’t Have to Keep a Diary One Page at a Time

Best tip from a SnapGuide post: How to Write and Keep a Diary by Heather Olson-Trow.

I think it also helps if your goal isn’t to get to the LAST page of your diary, but instead, to try to use each page the way you want, which will slowly but surely fill the whole book!

I do write in a journal way, making each entry for each day. At least I don’t restrict every day to one page. I write until I’m done, regardless of how many pages it fills. But, I do have a hard time stopping before the page is full.

So, instead of filling it with more writing, leave space you can fill in later with details like mementos, after thoughts and updates.

Keeping a Bullet Journal Sounds Like a Digital To-Do List

I keep private (unpublished) posts in my sites for making notes like this. I always know where they are and they are in the place I will (eventually) use them. At some point I found PressForward as a way to link to the source of my inspiration and make my own notes to go along with it.

You may have noticed that there’s been something of a resurgence in journaling lately. If you’re ever on Instagram, Pinterest, or YouTube, you may have seen people who keep “bullet journals” — Ryder Carroll’s name for an originally simple set of ways to keep lists and notes.

Some people’s bullet journals are Instagram masterpieces, with color-coded tracking systems, calligraphy flourishes for every day, and “spreads” showing impeccably illustrated weekly grocery lists.

In my experience, creative people need journals. They’re the greenhouses where we grow ideas. And the laboratories where we practice fiendish experiments.

 

My (very ugly) bullet journal has to-do lists, project notes, content plans for the blog and the podcast, thoughts about habits, thoughts about my business, quotes, doodles, sketches, workout notes, the recurring script for my podcast intro, product ideas, call notes, grand ideas for the future, and all manner of lists.

If you keep a journal like this digitally, and you haven’t tried paper for a while … allow me to suggest that you try it out. There’s something deeply creatively satisfying about an actual object stuffed with ideas — a collection of digital notes just doesn’t spark the same excitement.

A creative journal is a place to capture the sparks that float past. It’s a space to experiment, plan, or just goof around. It’s a home for random thoughts and interesting brainworms. It’s where you store dreams that scare you a little.

Flip through your journal sometimes. (You’ll find yourself doing that automatically when you need a content idea or think of a use for that reference note.)

Those social media phrases you’re finding from our first prompt? Copying them into a blank book would be a great way to kick off a new journal.

A final word on keeping a journal: We might need a word for the folks who keep them, but that word is not journalist. I know I am old-fashioned, but I’m clinging to that one for my friends and colleagues who went to journalism school, have put their time in for lousy pay under intense deadlines, and who have the job of defending democracy from charlatans and lunatics.

From CopyBlogger.